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birdasaurus:

Michael Giroux
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spiritualinspiration:

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Spiritual Inspiration (Get Out The Box) 4048 English Creek Ave. EHT, NJ 08234
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spiritualinspiration:

Did you know that when you do something to the best of your ability because you want to honor God, it opens the door to His blessing? That means it will be easier, it will go better, and you will accomplish more. That’s why no matter what we do, we should give it our best. This is especially true even in the little things. For example, when you’re doing the dishes or mowing the lawn, don’t drag around sour and frustrated. Mow with enthusiasm! Mow it like you’re on a mission from God. With every step, thank God that your legs work. Thank Him that you’re healthy and strong. At the office, don’t just do enough to get by. You’re not working unto people, you’re working unto God. Do it with your whole heart. When you volunteer at church, don’t wake up and think, “Awe, man. Why did I volunteer? I want to sleep in!” No, serve Him with all your heart because that’s what honors God. When you honor God,. He’ll honor you. He’ll give you His life, peace, health and blessing now and forevermore.
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youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 
Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.
Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.
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italdred:

Alley in Cholon : Chinatown, Saigon (by CitizenJane190)
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psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.
Fact submitted by: unseendimple
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spiritualinspiration:

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 Mail us @ Get Out The Box, Inc. 4048 English Creek Ave. EHT, NJ 08234
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